I'm from Missouri

This site is named for the famous statement of US Congressman Willard Duncan Vandiver from Missouri : "I`m from Missouri -- you'll have to show me." This site is dedicated to skepticism of official dogma in all subjects. Just-so stories are not accepted here. This is a site where controversial subjects such as evolution theory and the Holocaust may be freely debated.

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Location: Los Angeles, California, United States

My biggest motivation for creating my own blogs was to avoid the arbitrary censorship practiced by other blogs and various other Internet forums. Censorship will be avoided in my blogs -- there will be no deletion of comments, no closing of comment threads, no holding up of comments for moderation, and no commenter registration hassles. Comments containing nothing but insults and/or ad hominem attacks are discouraged. My non-response to a particular comment should not be interpreted as agreement, approval, or inability to answer.

Monday, July 31, 2006

Museum of Unnatural History

A news article reporting on the construction of a $25 million "Creation Museum" says:

PETERSBURG, Ky. (July 31) - Like most natural history museums, this one has exhibits showing dinosaurs roaming the Earth. Except here, the giant reptiles share the forest with Adam and Eve.


That, of course, is contradicted by science, but that's the point of the $25 million Creation Museum rising fast in rural Kentucky . . . . . . . .


"If the Bible is the word of God, and its history really is true, that's our presupposition or axiom, and we are starting there," museum founder Ken Ham said during recent tour of the sleek and modern facility, which is due to open next year.

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8 Comments:

Blogger Dave Fafarman said...

< That, of course, is contradicted by science, but that's the point of the $25 million Creation Museum rising fast in rural Kentucky ... >

That is their point?

I guess they need to provide some "evidence" to back up all those dinosaur stories in the Bible.

By the way, what is your point, Larry(?), in posting this? Wasn't ID supposed to be "scientific"?

Tuesday, August 01, 2006 10:18:00 AM  
Blogger Dave Fafarman said...

< $25 million >

Again I'd like to point out the extraordinary good that could be done with such an amount, and that could be done by evangelicals such as the folks who run Mercy Ships, American Leprosy Missions, Smile Train, Persecution Project, ...

What a waste!

Tuesday, August 01, 2006 10:36:00 AM  
Blogger Larry Fafarman said...

Fake Dave Fafarman said --

>>>>>By the way, what is your point, Larry(?), in posting this? Wasn't ID supposed to be "scientific"?<<<<<<

From time to time I just post news items of general interest. There are many important news items that I do not post because these news items may be found on Uncommon Descent, Panda's Thumb, and Dispatches from the Culture Wars (all in the links list in the left sidebar of the home page).

>>>>>< $25 million >

Again I'd like to point out the extraordinary good that could be done with such an amount, and that could be done by evangelicals such as the folks who run Mercy Ships, American Leprosy Missions, Smile Train, Persecution Project, ...

What a waste!<<<<<<

Man does not live by bread alone. -- JC

O, reason not the need! -- King Lear

Tuesday, August 01, 2006 4:11:00 PM  
Anonymous king lear said...

"O, reason not!" -- King Larryf

Wednesday, August 02, 2006 4:34:00 PM  
Blogger Dave Fafarman said...

<< What a waste!<<<<<<

Man does not live by bread alone. -- JC >>

Well, this sort of raises the "faith versus works" issue.

In other contexts it doesn't bother me as much, when religions spend a lot on promoting worship that they could spend on doing good works. (The difference for me here is the promotion of untruth.)

But I still think it is better to demonstrate one's faith by loving one's fellow man. I think JC would really approve of, say, the Mercy Ships' volunteers.

Wednesday, August 02, 2006 7:39:00 PM  
Blogger Dave Fafarman said...

I'd like to address some philosophical issues I've been pondering for a while -- I hope you all will bear with me. The relevance should become apparent.

I believe that we live in two parallel universes -- the material universe and the spiritual universe.

In the material universe, we are individuals, we make a living, perform science, etc. The material universe is actually a hologram (which is most clearly shown by the conservation of angular momentum). It is the hologram that enforces what we call natural law.

The spiritual universe has different rules. It is timeless and spaceless. Deep connectivity within the spiritual universe is thus a to-be-expected side effect.

At the heart of the ID "controversy" is the question of whether, and how, these universes interact. Any such interactions cannot be the subject of "science" because, by definition, they are not reproducible.

It is my view that the progress of evolution is adequately explained by actions within the material hologram. It is very hazardous to claim otherwise, as there is then no obvious barrier to prevent falling completely overboard into mysticism, abandoning science and causation.

But there are other occurrences that make one wonder -- more than evolution actually.

For instance, as a patriotic American, I can't help wondering whether "God protected George Washington" in the Battle of Fort Duquesne, and afterward. If so, that would have required some strange intervention from the spiritual universe. Another example might have been protecting the USA at the Battle of Midway.

There is a recent news item that really challenges the "it's just coincidence" view of things. Excerpts:

* "This is the eeriest discovery I've ever heard of, especially given current events. It actually sends chills up my spine."

* "For this to have been an act of God, God would have to have been all-knowing, foreseen this very conflict roughly 1,000 years before it occurred, foreseen the bog market, foreseen the use of power tools, foreseen the individual working the equipment and ensured this particular one was working that part of that bog that day, have created the book of its various parts (leather, the paper within) in the first place, have placed it in that place for 1,000 years of earthquakes and various other acts of God, foreseen the person who purchased the land would happen to be of the save artifacts mindset (not common among money-hungry landowners) and foreseen the need to it open to that page on that day. I don't know, seems all haphazard to me."

I have previously roasted WND on this blog for anti-evolutionism and for promoting the "Noah's Ark discoveries" (IMO the Flood is contradicted by the evidence). But this occurrence really makes me wonder. I'm of a naturalistic frame of mind and therefore incline to the "coincidence" interpretation.

My guess is that the operative phrase is, "God helps those who help themselves." With all its ambiguities ...

Wednesday, August 02, 2006 9:00:00 PM  
Blogger Dave Fafarman said...

I was hoping to draw some comments regarding the hard questions of the relative value and proper place of "faith" and "works" in religion. And the even harder question of whether "miracles" (which I define as "influence from the spiritual world") exist at all.

I have heard it said that "God has no hands but yours and mine to perform His work." Looking at it that way, God is not omnipotent, but needs conscious creatures who can connect to the spiritual universe in order to do anything. If (big if) such connections are possible, they do not obviously violate causality, and would account for strange occurrences like the Irish bog book, especially if people can be influenced subconsciously.

Taking as an example the Biblical story of Moses and the burning bush, in this view the bush would burn only in Moses' imagination -- unless he ignited it. Causality would thus not be violated, but he might have been tuned in to a Source beyond ordinary experience.

A corollary is that "miracles" must be possible under natural law; otherwise they are imaginary.

A further corollary is that "Intelligent Design" is impossible, since there is no conscious being that could carry out the physical manipulations required. Therefore, if they were to happen, they would violate causality.

Thursday, August 03, 2006 3:06:00 PM  
Blogger Dave Fafarman said...

In my previous post quoting the paragraph that begins, "For this to have been an act of God, ...", note how the paragraph would be affected if there were somehow a communications channel where time did not exist. The word "foreseen" would become irrelevant. And the whole scenario would be much more plausible. (I agree that it is just about impossible otherwise.)

I'm not asserting that such a thing did happen, but it seems to me to about as likely as the whole thing being a coincidence.

I would also suggest that there are no grounds to assume that all "messages" transmitted on such a channel will be wholesome. Conceivably, you might tap into a vein of ultimate evil. Your own moral good sense and agency would still be needed.

Saturday, August 05, 2006 10:37:00 AM  

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