I'm from Missouri

This site is named for the famous statement of US Congressman Willard Duncan Vandiver from Missouri : "I`m from Missouri -- you'll have to show me." This site is dedicated to skepticism of official dogma in all subjects. Just-so stories are not accepted here. This is a site where controversial subjects such as evolution theory and the Holocaust may be freely debated.

Name:
Location: Los Angeles, California, United States

My biggest motivation for creating my own blogs was to avoid the arbitrary censorship practiced by other blogs and various other Internet forums. Censorship will be avoided in my blogs -- there will be no deletion of comments, no closing of comment threads, no holding up of comments for moderation, and no commenter registration hassles. Comments containing nothing but insults and/or ad hominem attacks are discouraged. My non-response to a particular comment should not be interpreted as agreement, approval, or inability to answer.

Saturday, May 23, 2009

NCSE still lying about Texas's influence on textbooks!

In an article in Seed(y) magazine, Josh Rosenau, a staff member of the National Center for Science Education, wrote,

. . because of the state’s enormous purchasing power for textbooks, Texas’s standards will ultimately affect textbooks nationwide. The board spent more than $200 million on K-12 textbooks last year—buying more high school science books than any other state. “Publishers typically write their textbooks to Texas standards and then sell those books to smaller states,” explains Kathy Miller of the civil liberties watchdog Texas Freedom Network. If the board rejects a textbook, it can destroy a publisher.


As I said before, school systems in other states are not required -- and are not even under any particular pressure -- to adopt Texas-approved textbooks. And even local school districts in Texas can use state-unapproved textbooks if the districts are willing to pay the full costs, which isn't much for individual textbooks. A popular biology textbook, "Biology" by Ken Miller and Joe Levine, comes in regular, Texas, California, Florida, and North Carolina editions.

But all is not lost. Professors in Texas and elsewhere are privately planning to boycott college textbooks from any publishers who let the board taint high school textbooks.


I doubt that it is possible to organize such a boycott that would be effective, and such a boycott would unfairly target textbook publishers that are heavily involved in both the high school and college markets. The Darwinists are really desperate to consider such a move.

Labels:

6 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Are you stupid? Of course other states aren't forced to use Texas textbooks. The article never says that! Instead, the article says that most publishers only MAKE textbooks for Texas guidelines. It's called capitalism. There is insufficient financial incentive for them to make an Oregon textbook, for instance, so they don't. THERE ARE VERY FEW TEXTBOOKS MADE THAT DO NOT CONFORM TO THE TEXAS GUIDELINES FOR OTHER STATES TO CHOOSE FROM. As a result, whatever Texas requires gets made by the publishers who ignore the other states because they wouldn't make any money catering to them. Producing, publishing and maketing a textbook is expensive, so there are few niche ones for the states to choose from.

Saturday, May 23, 2009 7:48:00 PM  
Blogger Larry Fafarman said...

>>>>>> THERE ARE VERY FEW TEXTBOOKS MADE THAT DO NOT CONFORM TO THE TEXAS GUIDELINES FOR OTHER STATES TO CHOOSE FROM. <<<<<<

You stupid dunghill, I gave the example of the Miller-Levine biology textbook that comes in regular, Texas, California, Florida, and North Carolina editions. With modern publishing methods, it is very easy to customize textbooks to suit the wishes of different states or local school districts.

Saturday, May 23, 2009 9:23:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

> it is very easy to customize textbooks to suit the wishes of different states or local school districts. <

Then what's your problem? The publishers can make a version for the flat Earth fanatics and the ID religionists and another for those who want to study science in their science classes.

Sunday, May 24, 2009 3:09:00 AM  
Anonymous Røst I Ødemarken said...

"With modern publishing methods, it is very easy to customize textbooks ..."Perhaps it is a good thing that customizing truth is more difficult.

Sunday, May 24, 2009 6:38:00 PM  
Blogger Larry Fafarman said...

Some comments are just too dumb to respond to.

Monday, May 25, 2009 10:27:00 AM  
Anonymous Michael said...

Josh needs to name some textbooks nationwide which he firmly believes that have been previously affected by Texas. Anyone can throw out accusations left and right about what sort impact it might have. He even might be referring to the courts in a way, you how that might go, if one court rules on a particular issue, other court may follow (but not all the time), and one can name those courts.

Right now all I believe is Josh Rosenau is trying to scare up support for his cause.

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 4:33:00 PM  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home